Colombia Free Trade Agreement List

Environmental protection obligations: Both sides have also committed to effectively enforcing their national environmental legislation and to enact, maintain and implement laws, regulations and other measures to meet their obligations under the multilateral environmental agreements covered. All environmental chapter obligations are subject to the same dispute resolution procedures and enforcement mechanisms as the commercial obligations of the APA. The agreement provides tariff concessions for processed agricultural products. Tariff concessions for certain agricultural commodities are covered by bilateral agricultural agreements, which are part of the instruments for creating a free trade area between the contracting parties. Why a Colombia-U.S. trade promotion agreement? Columbia-USA Trade Promotion Agreement supports more U.S. jobs, increases U.S. exports and increases U.S. competitiveness. This comprehensive trade agreement removes tariffs and other barriers to U.S. exports, expands trade between our two countries and stimulates economic growth in both countries.

For EFTA-Colombia trade statistics, see EFTA Trade Statistics Tool New Opportunities for U.S. Workers, Manufacturers, Farmers, and Ranchers: more than 80% of U.S. exports of consumer goods and manufactured goods to Colombia became free upon introduction and the remaining tariffs were eliminated over a 10-year period. U.S. products that have received immediate duty-free access include agricultural and construction equipment, aircraft and parts, auto parts, fertilizers and agrochemicals, computer equipment, medical and scientific equipment, and wood. More than half of U.S. agricultural exports became free when it came into force, with most of the remaining tariffs expiring over 15 years. Colombia has abolished tariffs on wheat, barley, soybeans, soy flour and flour, high quality beef, bacon, almost all fruits and vegetables, peanuts, whey, cotton and the vast majority of processed products. The TPA also provides duty-free access to certain quantities of standard beef, chicken-legged quarters, pork, corn, sorghum, feed, rice, soybean oil and dairy products through tariff quotas. Find out more here. As soon as the agreement enters into force, most industrial products, including fish and other seafood, will have duty-free access to the respective markets of efTA states.

For products imported into Colombia, most tariffs will be abolished after transitional periods of up to nine years. This asymmetric treatment reflects the differences in economic development of the contracting parties. The trade agreement with Colombia (COTPA) came into force on 15 May 2012. Most Colombian products currently arrive in the United States duty-free and the Goods Processing Tax (MPF) and virtually all will enter free of charge until COTPA is fully implemented in 2028. For more information on U.S. exporters, visit the Commerce Department at: 2016.export.gov/FTA/index.asp Why Colombia? Colombia is already a strong trading partner of the United States and has the potential to be an even more important place for business. Trade with Colombia offers increased economic opportunities for American producers, workers and farmers. Colombia is a growing market for U.S. exporters and a good economic and political partner for the United States. In addition, our trade agreement with Colombia supports other U.S.

trade and policy objectives in Latin America. The U.S.-Colombia Trade Agreement (TPA) came into force on May 15, 2012. The TPA is a comprehensive free trade agreement that eliminates tariffs and removes barriers to U.S. services, including financial services. It also includes important disciplines in the areas of customs management and

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